Forensic Update

Reflections on information management within the legal and regulatory arena

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A welcome trend indeed…

Posted by Johnny Lee on October 26, 2017

 

…just as Sarbanes-Oxley provoked focus resulting in the placement Directors who were financial experts, boards are now focusing on Directors who understand cyber risk.  

Approximately 30% of Fortune 100 companies now have CIOs serving on their boards as of the end of 2016 — a jump of 78% over the preceding two years…

Details here.

 

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Posted in eDiscovery | Comments Off on A welcome trend indeed…

Privacy + Security Forum…

Posted by Johnny Lee on August 31, 2017

Excited to represent Grant Thornton LLP and join Daniel Solove, Edward R. McNicholas, Jon Neiditz, Mauricio Paez, Liisa Thomas, Amanda Witt and a host of other luminaries and all-stars at the 2017 Privacy+Security Forum in Washington DC…

https://privacyandsecurityforum.com/

Posted in Computer Forensics, CyberSecurity, Data Breach, Data Governance, ECM, eDiscovery, Information Security, Privacy | Comments Off on Privacy + Security Forum…

Your move Schrödinger…

Posted by Johnny Lee on July 24, 2017

Posted in eDiscovery | Comments Off on Your move Schrödinger…

Test your systems to avoid embarrassment…

Posted by Johnny Lee on June 9, 2017

Before advancing undue burden arguments about being unable to find key documents, you may want to test your systems to avoid embarrassment…

Posted in Computer Forensics, Data Governance, ECM, eDiscovery, Litigation Hold, Records Retention | Comments Off on Test your systems to avoid embarrassment…

Separated by a common language…

Posted by Johnny Lee on April 13, 2017

[1] Board to CISO: Can we bounce back from a breach?

 

[2] CISO to Board: Unlikely…we need money & a LOT of work done immediately.

 

[3] What the Board hears…

Posted in eDiscovery | Comments Off on Separated by a common language…

One of my all-time favorites…

Posted by Johnny Lee on March 27, 2017

Posted in Announcement | Comments Off on One of my all-time favorites…

Design…test…repeat.

Posted by Johnny Lee on February 13, 2017

rxwseWe all work with model employees…none of them would ever knowingly flout policy…just the same, it’s a good idea to test the theory. #InfoSec

Posted in eDiscovery | Comments Off on Design…test…repeat.

Well…that’s one way to secure the Internet of Things.

Posted by Johnny Lee on January 7, 2017

FTC brings its third action against #IoT hardware manufacturers, as it sues D-Link for flaws in routers and internet cameras that purportedly resulted in consumers’ privacy being at risk.

D-Link joins Asus and TRENDnet as FTC targets under a theory of unfairness in violation of Section 5 of the FTC Act.

http://ow.ly/XMCm100y21t

Posted in CyberSecurity, Data Breach, eDiscovery | Comments Off on Well…that’s one way to secure the Internet of Things.

Minimize Business Email Compromise risk in 6 steps…

Posted by Johnny Lee on December 11, 2016

…a mix of training, process & technology to strengthen controls.gt_logo

ow.ly/Gqzx304SvS0

Posted in CyberSecurity, Data Breach, Data Governance, ECM, Information Security, Investigations, Privacy, Records Retention | Comments Off on Minimize Business Email Compromise risk in 6 steps…

What can we learn from the rash of revelations related to sizable hacks in 2012?

Posted by Johnny Lee on September 9, 2016

bitglass_wheres_your_data_thumbnail1Posit the research, which indicates that the average length of an un-detected compromise is in excess of 200 days. Couple that with research from security outfit Bitglass, and you’ve got some shocking correlations that put 2012 into a broader perspective.

That experiment employed data-tracking technology to track the traverse of sensitive data on the dark web post-compromise.
The upshot: In 12 days, these data were access 1,100 times within 22 countries, with two different cyber-crime syndicates sharing data with their peers…imagine how often compromised 2012 data changed hands over 4 years!

Bitglass Research

Posted in Computer Forensics, Data Governance, eDiscovery, Fraud, Information Security, Investigations, Privacy, Records Retention | Comments Off on What can we learn from the rash of revelations related to sizable hacks in 2012?

 
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